Fresh faces greet new school year

JACKSON – Students and their families meet their teachers and tour the school during Sister Thea Bowman’s back to school afternoon Sunday, August 6. Sister Thea Bowman, situated near Jackson State University, offers music, Spanish and technology as supplements to its excellent curriculum.(Photo by Melissa Smalley)

GREENVILLE – Friends reunite in the halls on the first day of class for St. Joseph school in Greenville. The unit school has new principals for both the elementary and high schools this fall.(Photo by Missi Blackstock)

NATCHEZ – At left, at Cathedral School, Beth Foster’s kindergarten class started their day with the Pledge of Allegiance on Monday, August 7. Cathedral Unit School offers pre-k through 12th grade education and welcomes a new administrator and high school principal this year. (Photo by Cara Serio)

MADISON –  first day at St. Anthony School. (Photos by Kristian Beatty)

MADISON – The seventh grade meets for the first time at St. Joseph School on Monday, August 7. Students from all Jackson-area Catholic elementary schools in addition to students who transfer from private and public schools, started their middle and high school journey as Bruins with a day of tours, orientation and lessons in the fight song. (Photo by Tricia Harris)

 

 

Archbishop Gregory asks survivors for forgiveness

(Editor’s note: Bishop Joseph Kopacz participated in this Mass during the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishop’s gathering. See related stories on pages 1 and 3.)
WASHINGTON – As they began the spring general assembly, bishops from across the U.S. gathered June 14 at Sts. Peter and Paul Cathedral in Indianapolis for a Mass of Prayer and Penance for survivors of sexual abuse within the Church. The Mass was held in response to a call from Pope Francis for all episcopal conferences across the world to have a Day of Prayer and Penance for victims of sexual abuse within the Church.
The bishops gathered together in solidarity to pray for victims and to acknowledge the pain caused by the failures of the Church in the past. The Mass marked the opening for the June plenary assembly of bishops held June 14-15 in Indianapolis.
Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo, of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston and president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, was the principal celebrant.

Atlanta Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory delivers the homily during Mass June 14 at SS. Peter and Paul Cathedral in Indianapolis during the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ annual spring assembly. (CNS photo/Sean Gallagher, The Criterion)

Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory, of Atlanta, and former president of the USCCB, was the homilist.
Following is the full text of Archbishop Gregory’s homily.
In the very same chapter of his Gospel in which St. Matthew presents his rendition of the Beatitudes, Jesus tells us that He has not come to abolish the law but to fulfill it. Clearly, the Beatitudes are in fact a startling new edition of God’s Law. Jesus is Himself both the new law and the fulfillment of the old law. He calls us to see with new eyes how to live in a world so continually filled with sorrow, injustice and violence and how important it is to acknowledge our own share in causing or compounding the sorrows, suffering and violence that often seem to surround us.
We bishops have learned a great deal about the sorrow and pain of those we love and serve, even as we have to acknowledge humbly, publicly and pitifully our share in bringing much of that pain to bear. We feel, we see, we live with, as they do in much greater measure, the impact of behaviors, responses and revelations that have no place in Matthew’s Gospel, in the Beatitudes, or in the narrative of Jesus’ promise to fulfill God’s Law. And yet only there, by His Grace and His unwavering example, can we begin to learn to heal and to reconcile — to bind the wounds and to assuage the sorrow. We recognize this even as Paul reminds us that we have been qualified for this ministry only by God’s purpose and designation.
Pope Francis has summoned us as bishops to find occasions and opportunities to pray earnestly for God’s grace to bring about the healing and the reconciliation of those who have been harmed in this tragedy that has hurt far too many of His people and far too much of His Church. The Holy Father has called us respectfully to acknowledge our own share in causing the pain that so many are still enduring.
At this Mass, we bishops humbly and sincerely ask for the forgiveness of those who have been harmed, scandalized or dispirited by events that, even if they happened many years ago, remain ongoing sources of anguish for them and for those who love them. We humbly seek forgiveness from the faith-filled people of our Church and from our society at-large — and especially from those whose lives may have been devastated by our failure to care adequately for the little ones entrusted to us and for any decision that we made or should have made that exacerbated the sorrow and heartache that the entire Church has felt and continues to feel — for what we have done, and for what we have failed to do. We can never say that we are sorry enough for the share that we have had in this tragedy of broken fidelity and trust.

Clergymen pray during Mass at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ annual spring assembly June 14 at SS. Peter and Paul Cathedral in Indianapolis. (CNS photo/Mike Krokos, The Criterion)

With hearts that are contrite we ask the forgiveness of God, our Almighty Father, under whose purpose and designation we are entrusted with this ministry, and whom we disgrace most profoundly when we fall so woefully short.
There have been many procedural and educational expressions of our commitment to reform and renewal that have been put into place in the past 15 years. They are sincere, state-of-the-art, and effective. Nevertheless, this expression of our sorrow is far more important at this time, in this place, than any administrative process or training effort, however beneficial to the Church and to the world.
While we have had many opportunities to pray in our own dioceses with survivors, their families and our people, we gather this evening as a community of bishops to pray together for the grace of healing and reconciliation that only the Lord Jesus Himself can bestow upon His Church. While there is still more, always more, that must and will be done to assure our people of our dedication and commitment to safeguarding the innocent lives of our young and vulnerable faithful, this evening we acknowledge that ultimately it must be the Lord Himself who heals and reconciles the hearts of those who live with the pain of God’s law unheeded.
For that Grace, with sincere hearts, with contrite spirits and with a renewed promise to protect, we simply pray this evening. Amen

Clergymen pray during Mass at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ annual spring assembly June 14 at SS. Peter and Paul Cathedral in Indianapolis. (CNS photo/Mike Krokos, The Criterion)

Jóvenes hispanos celebran la resurrección de Cristo

El 22 de abril, unos 30 jóvenes hispanos celebraron la resurrección de nuestro Señor durante el primer “Pascua Juvenil, Viva Cristo Rey” en el Locus Benedictus en Greenwood. El día consistió en oración, canciones, actividades al aire libre, videos, sesiones de escucha y más. Sacerdotes Redentoristas del Delta estaban disponibles para escuchar confesiones y el día terminó con la celebración de la Santa Misa.

Memorial to honor Durant Sisters

By Maureen Smith
DURANT – On Saturday, May 20, at 3 p.m., the community is invited to honor the memory of Sisters Paula Merrill, SCN, and Margaret Held, SSSF. Father Greg Plata, OFM, will bless and dedicate a marker to the two women in Liberty Park in Durant, Miss. The women were found murdered in their home in Durant in August 2016. Both had been nurse practitioners at a medical clinic in Lexington.


Carolyn Reynolds, an alderwoman in Durant, conceived the idea of a memorial. “She called me, she didn’t really know the sisters, she had never met them, in fact, but she knew about all the good work they had done and thought it would be tragic if there was no memorial for them,” said Father Plata.
“She was hearing people in Durant talk about them – grown men were crying about them so she thought ‘surely someone like this needs some recognition,’” said Jaime Sample, the music minister at Lexington St. Thomas Parish where the sisters were in the choir. “I still cry sometimes when I am selecting music,” said Sample.
Family members and members of the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth and the School Sisters of St. Francis will be on hand for the dedication. In fact, the Sisters of Charity will arrive early and spend a week doing service in Durant, which is currently cleaning up from a tornado.
The monument will include pictures of the sisters and will sit near a similar marker dedicated to two Durant natives who died on 9/11. The dedication service will include scripture readings and the sisters’ favorite songs, ‘This Alone I Ask,’ and ‘How Can I Keep from Singing’ as well as some reflections from close friends and family members. After the service, the community will gather for Mass at 4:30 at St. Thomas.
“I still miss them, but I know they are still with us. I know they are watching over us,” said Sample. The parish is still accepting donations for the marker. They can be sent to St. Thomas Catholic Church, 200 Boulevard St., Lexington, MS, 39095 or via Go Fund Me at: https://www.gofundme.com/3r26suw.

Carmelite shop renovated, updated, ready for new business

JACKSON – The Carmelite gift shop on Terry Road in Jackson celebrated a grand re-opening on Saturday, April 22. The shop was relocated to the convent for a couple of months while work crews overhauled the space. Father Kevin Slattery, vicar general for the Diocese of Jackson, blessed the space and welcomed guests after Mass.
The Knights of Coulmbus from Clinton Holy Savior built two ramps, one from the outside of the store and another from the convent to the back door.

Workers removed some walls inside the buidling, a pre-Civil War house, to create more open space and either restored or replaced the wood flooring. The windows were uncovered and cleaned and the shop has new lights and new paint. The result is a much brigher, open space. The shop’s signature Fontanini nativities have their own room and the other inventory has been reorganized.
The sisters are grateful for the many years of support from the faithful and want to remind people they are open for business.

Father Delaney celebrates 60th anniversary

By Maureen Smith

Father Delaney (Photo courtesy of Janice Stansell)

CRYSTAL SPRINGS – Father Tom Delaney will celebrate 60 years as a priest this June. The 83-year-old continues to serve as the pastor of St. John parish and St. Martin of Tours mission. “I plan to continue in active ministry for as long as the Lord gives me breath,” he said during a recent interview. His parish of Crystal Springs St. John has planned a Mass and lunch for Saturday, June 24, starting at 11 a.m.
Father Delaney had to work hard just to get to Mississippi in 1959. He was ready to make the trip after his June 8, 1957, ordination, but an x-ray required for a visa showed a shadow on his lung. When he followed up with a doctor he discovered he had tuberculosis. It took almost a year of treatment and months of monitoring to heal completely before he was allowed a visa. He has never had a lung problem since.
Last July he had an aortic valve replaced, and this year had a malignant spot removed from his head, but he describes himself as being in good health.
“I have enjoyed my service in Mississippi and I have been blessed by the friendship of so many people, brother priests and bishops. I was lucky to know Bishops Gerow, Brunini, Howze (of Biloxi), Houck, Latino and now Bishop Kopacz,” said Father Delaney.
He has served all across the state, starting in Bay St. Louis at Our Lady of the Gulf before the creation of the Diocese of Biloxi. He went on to Greenville St. Joseph, Jackson St. Peter, Pearl St. Jude, Starkville St. Joseph, Port Gibson St. Joseph, Grenada St. Peter, Greenwood Immaculate Heart of Mary and Crystal Springs St. John along with its mission of Hazelhurst St. Martin of Tours. “I hope I have done some good,” said Father Delaney when reflecting on his time here.
Father Delaney also served as the chaplain for the state hospital at Whitfield, Mercy Hospital in Vicksburg, the moderator for the Catholic physicians’ guild and chaplain for Catholic nurses as well as once being a moderator and advocate for the marriage tribunal. “I would like to add one thing, I want to apologize to anyone whose feelings I may have hurt over the years,” said Father Delaney.
(Editor’s note: Father Tom Delaney was inadvertently omitted from the article in the past issue about significant anniversaries. I apologize for the error.)

Partnership enlivens parish, school, gives seminarians insights

By Peter Finney Jr.
NEW ORLEANS (CNS) – It was 10:10 a.m. on Sunday, Aug. 28 – 20 minutes before the regular 10:30 a.m. Mass at St. Rita Church in New Orleans – normally a time when the church is pin-drop quiet except for the sacristan, the organist and a few early arrivers reciting the rosary.
But as parishioners began filing into the church for Mass that day, they witnessed something they had not seen in years – their church half-filled with people.
Men, some dressed in coats and ties, some in black suits with Roman collars, were spread out in the pews, reading their morning prayers or praying silently.
“I thought it was a funeral or a wedding,” one parishioner said with a laugh, astonished by the sight of more than 100 seminarians, including some from the Diocese of Jackson, from Notre Dame Seminary sitting or kneeling in the pews.
That Sunday was the first manifestation of a bold initiative launched by Father James Wehner, rector of Notre Dame Seminary, and New Orleans Archbishop Gregory M. Aymond to have the 136-member seminary community partner with nearby St. Rita Parish.
The idea is simple but bold.

Joe Bass, seminarian at Notre Dame Seminary in New Orleans, talks with a young parishioner of St. Rita Parish in New Orleans after Sunday Mass Aug. 27. (CNS photo/Peter Finney Jr., Clarion Herald) See SEMINARY-PARISH-PARTNERSHIP Dec. 2, 2016.

Joe Bass, seminarian at Notre Dame Seminary in New Orleans, talks with a young parishioner of St. Rita Parish in New Orleans after Sunday Mass Aug. 27. (CNS photo/Peter Finney Jr., Clarion Herald) See SEMINARY-PARISH-PARTNERSHIP Dec. 2, 2016.

On most Sundays, the Notre Dame Seminary community will join the parishioners of St. Rita for the parish-seminary Mass at 10:30 a.m. A group of seminarians opens the church each weekday at 6 a.m. for morning prayer and eucharistic adoration, which lasts until the 7 a.m. weekday Mass.
About 20 third-year seminarians also serve during the week as mentors to the students at St. Rita School, sitting in on classes, answering questions the students might have or just playing with them on the playground.
Father Wehner is the canonical pastor of St. Rita, and Father Peter Finney is the administrator, handling the day-to-day operations of the church and school and overseeing the seminarians in their new apostolic work.
While the partnership is a work in progress, one thing clear is: The church is more alive than ever.
“We were a smaller parish before, and now, with all these seminarians, it’s brought life to the parish,” said Dr. Thomas Ryan, secretary of the St. Rita parish council.
Father Wehner and Father Finney wanted to assure parishioners from the outset that the seminary was not going to be taking control of the parish. They met with parishioners in July and told them they were there to listen and to see what the parish’s needs were.
“We’re starting off very slowly,” Father Wehner told The Clarion Herald, the archdiocesan newspaper.
There is a two-pronged approach for the seminarians. The first is the liturgical experience, bringing the entire seminary community together at St. Rita for Sunday Mass where “seminarians will simply attend and worship side-by-side with the lay faithful.”
“The idea is that after four to six years – the length of their time at Notre Dame Seminary – they will have cultivated friendships with parishioners during the school year, consistent with their seminary formation, which we see as a benefit,” Father Wehner said. “At the end of the day, priestly ministry is dedicated to the lay faithful. These seminarians will be praying for St. Rita Parish and its neighborhood and the school children and for their intentions. There will be a parochial foundation for their spirituality.” Two seminarians have been assigned to each grade level for the entire year.
“Those seminarians will know the children’s names and their families and their background,” Father Wehner said. “That pastoral ministry will contribute to an understanding of the whole reason of why they are in the seminary to begin with.”
Beyond that, another six to eight seminarians will help Father Wehner and Father Finney by sitting in on the parish council and finance council meetings and by helping out with adult education. Pastoral outreach has started with two seminarians, equipped with iPads, inputting and updating parishioners’ information in the parish record-keeping software.
“The involvement of the seminarians will increase,” Father Wehner said. “This is the first year, and we feel that the liturgical dimensions and the pastoral dimensions are a good way to go.”

Nick Adam of the Diocese of Jackson, uses an iPad to update family information for St. Rita Parish in New Orleans Oct. 22. (CNS photo/Peter Finney Jr., Clarion Herald) See SEMINARY-PARISH-PARTNERSHIP Dec. 2, 2016.

Nick Adam of the Diocese of Jackson, uses an iPad to update family information for St. Rita Parish in New Orleans Oct. 22. (CNS photo/Peter Finney Jr., Clarion Herald) See SEMINARY-PARISH-PARTNERSHIP Dec. 2, 2016.

Father Finney said the experience thus far has exceeded expectations. Recently, the parish picnic that drew about 50 people last year attracted more than 200. While children played on inflatables, seminarian Matthew Hoffpauir, studying for the Archdiocese of New Orleans, set up an easel to draw caricatures. “I can draw (almost) anything in 45 seconds,” he wrote, piquing the interest of kids.
“It’s really been great for the school kids,” Father Finney said. “They don’t really know how to make heads or tails of all these guys coming into their classes, but it’s been good to give them some practical, real and ongoing relationships. This isn’t something where we’re parachuting in and out.”
The idea for the seminarians is to encourage them to “think with the mind of a parochial vicar” and to think more “long-term,” Father Finney said.
As the initiative progresses, Father Wehner and Father Finney, who took over in July, want to find out more about what the parish’s needs are. The parish currently has 343 registered families but has added families in recent weeks.
“You want to bring people in, but what are you offering them?” Father Finney said. “We can offer them liturgy and prayer at this point, but we still need to get to know our people a little bit and develop what we have here before engaging in that.”
Karen Henderson, principal of St. Rita School, said she has been amazed by the benefits of the interaction between the seminarians and her students.
“We’re extremely excited about just having their presence,” Henderson said. “We’ve had seminarians teaching religion or assisting the teachers with religion. We’ve had them serve as mentors, for our young boys, in particular. To have so many men of faith is wonderful.”
In Stefanie Cronin’s fourth-grade class recently, seminarian Cletus Orji of New Orleans helped students by holding their handmade projects as they described the significance of them. After each child finished, Orji gave the students a high-five.
Orji said he’s gained an appreciation for the teachers’ deep well of patience, something he can make use of when he becomes a priest.
Ryan, the parish council secretary, said the seminary-parish partnership is like “learning to dance together.”

Blake Dubroc, studying for the priesthood for the Diocese of Lafayette, La., plays soccer in New Orleans with a child at the St. Rita Parish picnic Oct. 9. (CNS photo/Peter Finney Jr., Clarion Herald) See SEMINARY-PARISH-PARTNERSHIP Dec. 2, 2016.

Blake Dubroc, studying for the priesthood for the Diocese of Lafayette, La., plays soccer in New Orleans with a child at the St. Rita Parish picnic Oct. 9. (CNS photo/Peter Finney Jr., Clarion Herald) See SEMINARY-PARISH-PARTNERSHIP Dec. 2, 2016.

“This is unique around the country, and there’s no instruction booklet on how this should work,” Ryan said. “Something we need to watch out for is that the seminarians would come and take over, not out of spite or anything like that but because of their love of the parish and their love of ministry. The challenge is for the seminarians to empower the laity to work in ministry and live out their baptismal vocation.”
He likened it to a teaching hospital. “Medical schools do that. They want their medical students to learn on the job, so that’s what the seminarians are doing here,” he explained. “I think it’s great they want to learn from us. I think other dioceses can learn from this.”
(Finney is executive editor/general manager of the Clarion Herald, newspaper of the Archdiocese of New Orleans.)

Holy Family sponsors ecumenical ministry

JACKSON – Since July, Holy Family Parish has been involving parishioners, especially the youth, in an ecumenical outreach ministry to the senior citizens and the elementary-aged children from nearby churches. There are eight churches within three miles of the parish.
In October, residents of NCBA Estates, an independent living residence for senior citizens, attended a “Meet and greet our neighbors” activity at which 35 of the 40 plus residents were present. Residents filled out a survey of preferred activities and Holy Family worked to arrange those things, such as rides to Mass Sundays and to the polls on election day.
The Nov. 11 fish fry and bingo night activity was also well-attended. Father Xavier

Jackson Holy Family hosted a fish fry and bingo night for local seniors as part of an ecumenical outreach ministry.

Jackson Holy Family hosted a fish fry and bingo night for local seniors as part of an ecumenical outreach ministry.

Amirtham, pastor, and the pastoral council prepared and served more than 50 meals. The next opportunity to fellowship, at the residents’ request, is a Christmas celebration. (Submitted by Corinne W. Anderson)

Jackson Holy Family hosted a fish fry and bingo night for local seniors as part of an ecumenical outreach ministry.

Jackson Holy Family hosted a fish fry and bingo night for local seniors as part of an ecumenical outreach ministry.

Jackson Holy Family hosted a fish fry and bingo night for local seniors as part of an ecumenical outreach ministry.

Jackson Holy Family hosted a fish fry and bingo night for local seniors as part of an ecumenical outreach ministry.

Jackson Holy Family hosted a fish fry and bingo night for local seniors as part of an ecumenical outreach ministry.

Jackson Holy Family hosted a fish fry and bingo night for local seniors as part of an ecumenical outreach ministry.

Participen con una donación el 29 de noviembre

PrintLa Diócesis de Jackson está en segundo lugar entre las organizaciones participantes en #iGiveCatholic. En primer lugar está el fundador de este programa, la Arquidiócesis de Nueva Orleáns.
Por primera vez este año, el 29 de noviembre, será un día en el cual la comunidad católica de todo el mundo podrá hacer donaciones en el internet a su(s) organizaciones de preferencia. #iGiveCatholic, Día Mundial de Donación, es un llamado para compartir nuestras bendiciones con la iglesia y los que la iglesia ayuda y apoya en nuestras comunidades.
El equipo detrás de este ‘Martes donante’ pensó que debería haber un día en el cual la gente pueda ofrecer donaciones a sus comunidades durante los días feriados. Ellos crearon un movimiento en el internet alentando a la gente a dar donaciones a sus organizaciones favoritas de caridad durante el martes después del Día de Acción de Gracias y anunciar su donación usando el hashtag #GivingTuesday como una manera de alentar a otros a donar.
Este 29 de noviembre, casi 50 parroquias, escuelas y misiones en la diócesis recibirán donaciones durante 24 horas a través de la página web www.igivecatholic.com. Vea los perfiles de estas organizaciones en sus paginas de internet para averiguar cómo utilizarán el dinero.
La idea se ha expandido de manera que la gente puede ahora honrar su fe con su donación. Varias diócesis han unido fuerzas para crear este año #iGiveCatholic.
Las organizaciones recibirán todo el dinero que les sea donado mientras iGiveCatholic mantendrá la página web y su infraestructura.
Rebecca Harris, directora ejecutiva de la Fundación Católica, recientemente dijo que espera que todos visiten la pagina de facebook de la Diócesis de Jackson y ayuden a correr la voz al publicar su donación.
Oficinas diocesanas y fondos:
Caridades Católicas
La Fundación Católica
Archivos de la Diócesis de Jackson
Oficina del Ministerio de los Negros
Oficina de Educación Católica
Oficina de Vocaciones
Oficina del Ministerio de los Jóvenes
Orden de las Carmelitas Descalzas
Fondo de Retiro de los Sacerdotes
Fondo de Educación para los Seminaristas

Parroquias y misiones
Amory St. Helen Parish
Batesville St. Mary Parish
Bruce St. Luke the Evangelist Parish
Clarksdale Immaculate Conception Parish
Clarksdale St. Elizabeth Parish
Greenville St. Joseph Parish
Greenwood St. Francis Parish
Grenada St. Peter Parish
Hernando Holy Spirit Parish
Holly Springs St. Gregory the Great Parish
Holly Springs St. Joseph Parish
Jackson Cathedral of St. Peter the Apostle
Jackson St. Therese Parish
Leland St. James Parish
Madison St. Francis of Assisi Parish
McComb St. Alphonsus Parish
New Albany St. Francis of Assisi Parish
Olive Branch Queen of Peace Parish
Pearl St. Jude Parish
Pontotoc St. Christopher Mission
Robinsonville Good Shepherd Parish
Sardis St. John Parish
Senatobia St. Gregory
Southaven Christ the King Parish
Tupelo St. James Parish
Vicksburg St. Michael Parish
Colegios:
Clarksdale St. Elizabeth
Columbus Annunciation
Flowood St. Paul Early Learning Center
Greenville Our Lady of Lourdes
Greenville St. Joseph
Greenwood St. Francis of Assisi
Holly Springs Holy Family
Jackson Sister Thea Bowman
Jackson St. Richard
Madison St. Anthony
Madison St. Joseph
Meridian St. Patrick
Natchez Cathedral
Southaven Sacred Heart
Vicksburg Catholic